Gulgong’s Holtermann Museum launch reveals first drawings

Holtermann Museum architect Jiri Loew (front) with steering committee members Maurice Gaudry, Bill Larner, David Warner, Chris Pearson, Maureen Hall, Barbara Hickson and Bruce McGregor. PHOTO: Elle watson

Holtermann Museum architect Jiri Loew (front) with steering committee members Maurice Gaudry, Bill Larner, David Warner, Chris Pearson, Maureen Hall, Barbara Hickson and Bruce McGregor. PHOTO: Elle watson

Multifunction pavilions and niche study areas will form part of the design for Gulgong’s Holtermann Museum. 

The first technical drawings of the proposed museum, that will display the UNESCO listed Holtermann Gulgong and Hill End gold rush photographs, were unveiled at a project launch on Thursday.  

More than 50 residents and supporters of the project toured The American Tobacco Warehouse Company and The Greatest Wonder of the World site, photographed by Beaufoy Merlin and Charles Bayliss in the late 1800s.  

Speaking to the crowd last week, Mudgee architect Jiri Loew described a series of three multifunctional spaces; the first to be used as an extension of the exhibition space and for temporary exhibits; the second an event space and the third a workshop space. 

“We’re thinking of restoring the front facade so it resembles as much as possible the Holtermann pictures.”

He said the structures will not imitate the three century old building but compliment and pay respect to Gulgong’s gold rush past. 

“A series of yards and gardens and also a series of buildings [will be included],” Mr Loew said. 

“Giving the feeling it is a larger place than it actually is.” 

“We’re thinking of restoring the front facade so it resembles as much as possible the Holtermann pictures.”

Where possible key features will be restored and others (including part of the frame and a rear fireplace) preserved. 

The ‘complex’ will be accessible from front and back through intertwined parallel passages. 

Chairman of the museum steering committee, Chris Pearson, said above all the museum would provide education based on entertainment.

“Though suffering the rigours of time we are grateful they remain and hope to use some of those (features) in our design,” Mr Pearson said. 

Fellow member, David Warner said part of the committee’s vision is for a bank of computers that would allow students and visitors to bring up any desired photograph out of the Holtermann collection. 

Fresh from negotiations with the State Library – caretakers of the collection – Mr Warner said talks have been positive. 

“All the photographs are available to us and it’s up to us what we want to do with them,” Mr Warner said.

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