Mudgee's wettest September on record

WATER COURSE: The record September rainfall in Mudgee - at 172.4mm as of Thursday - is seen in Redbank Creek's path through the Golf Course.

WATER COURSE: The record September rainfall in Mudgee - at 172.4mm as of Thursday - is seen in Redbank Creek's path through the Golf Course.

The previous record for Mudgee’s wettest September has well and truly been passed and then some. The area has already received nearly 60mm more than the previous benchmark with a week still left in the month.

The 172.4mm of rain – as of Thursday - so far is the highest September figure ever recorded at the Bureau of Meteorology’s weather station at the Mudgee Airport.

The previous record for the month was 113.6mm back in 2005.

The September average in Mudgee has also been washed away with the current figure more than three times that of the norm of 56.6mm.

The wettest day has been the 24 hours to 9am on Saturday the 3rd when 37.2mm collected in the BOM rain gauge.

Which seems to be true of the month, when it rains it pours, on eight of the wet days the amount that fell has been in double figures – in fact September 3 was preceded by 11.8mm and 29.8mm on the first two days receptively.

Other days to get a soaking include the 24 hour periods prior to; Monday the 9th (30.6mm); Thursday the 22nd (17mm); Saturday the 10th (14.8mm); and Thursday the 15th (13.8mm).

And there could be more on the way before September is done, with a 90 per cent chance of 5-10mm of rain forecast for Wednesday the 28th.

The record weather is happening right across the country, with many areas receiving more rain in the last three weeks than they usually see during all of spring.

The nation's second wettest winter on record has overflowed into September, resulting in widespread river flooding through central and eastern states.

There has been so much rain in recent weeks that some towns are now having one of their wettest springs on record, only three weeks into the season.

According to BOM it’s been caused by a surge in strength of the negative Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD), combined with a La Niña–like pattern in the tropical Pacific Ocean and seas around Australia, is strongly influencing Australian climate.

And computer models are indicating that rain in the middle of next week.

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