Your say: five years rego sticker free

A poll of visitors to the Mudgee Guardian website found nearly 60 per cent had missed their vehicle’s registration date – or sympathise with those who have – since the removal of rego stickers.

In 2013 the NSW abolished registration stickers for light vehicles, although we’re still being reminded each year when the rego papers arrive.

In answering ‘have you missed a rego date since stickers have been abolished?’; 58.78 per cent answered ‘yes, that extra reminder would've been handy’; while 38.93 per cent voted ‘no, being posted the rego papers is enough’.

So the majority of responses of those who had their say on the Mudgee Guardian Facebook page admitting they were caught out, knew someone who has been or understand how it happens.

“I prefer stickers. At least you can see at a glance when rego is coming up,” one comment read.

With car servicing cited as another reminder on the windscreen of your car.

Having multiple vehicles was another reason why some motorists liked stickers.

“We run a business and it was peace of mind when an employee drives a company car that they knew it was registered. If it wasn't and they were driving it they would be fined,” was one reply.

Although those who haven’t been caught out claim that there are enough reminders, such as those you can ask the Roads and Maritime Services to send you.

“I got sent about five text messages plus emails plus letters in the mail, I honestly don't know how you can forget it,” one comment read.

In the first 12 months the number of motorists caught driving an unregistered vehicle in NSW increased by 21 per cent (up to 79,408).

And between 2010 and 2015 (the five years covering the decision) infringements surged by 54 per cent, with the drivers aged 64 and over age group representing the biggest increase at 148 per cent.

Prior to the decision a review found that the presence of stickers on windscreens was not a reliable indicator that vehicles were registered. 

And police vehicles fitted with automatic number plate recognition technology can check your registration as they pass you on the road.

Revenue and fines were talked about by responders, who won’t be pleased that the aforementioned increase in fines following the abolishment lead to a near doubling of revenue for the government to $50 million.