NSW Police boss Mick Fuller to unveil regional enforcement and domestic violence squads

BRINGING GOOD NEWS: Mick Fuller (centre) will join with Gary Worboys (left) and others to make multiple announcements in Dubbo on Tuesday.
BRINGING GOOD NEWS: Mick Fuller (centre) will join with Gary Worboys (left) and others to make multiple announcements in Dubbo on Tuesday.

NSW Police Commissioner Mick Fuller will be in Dubbo on Tuesday to make announcements regarding the formation of regional enforcement and domestic violence units.

Mr Fuller will join with NSW police minister Troy Grant, deputy commissioner Gary Worboys and Western Region commander, assistant commissioner Geoff McKechnie for the announcement.

The new units, particularly the regional enforcement squad (RES) will form the first part of the re-engineering process of the rural arm of the NSW Police Force, and Mr Worboys said they will provide an agility to policing not seen before.

“We already have committed to four RES units across country NSW, and on Tuesday Dubbo will be part of that and we will commit to supporting and enhancing the units as we move forward,” Mr Worboys said.

“We are looking forward to seeing results. This was a strong push by Commissioner Fuller right from the start that the RES works particularly well in the city over any amount of challenges and we believe that model can work.

“Given good information, leadership and support they can interrupt mid-level drug supply, as well as chase down people who break into houses, or steal cars. And the domestic violence unit will be a specialist group of its own as well.

“We need that agility and flexibility to deploy to other places of need as well.

“Essentially what it will be is  small group of people in Dubbo who will live in or close to Dubbo, and come to work at Dubbo.

“Dubbo is a place they will find a lot of work but they will also be able to support small villages and towns when there is the need.”

In an interview with the Daily Liberal back in May, Mr Worboys outlined his vision for the units.

“Across regional NSW we have nearly 5000 police, and what we’re looking to do is have the ability to move some of them as the need arises and disrupt crime cycles,” he said.

“As an example if the RES is based out of Dubbo and there’s a spike in break-and-enters in Bathurst, those officers can be deployed down there to tackle that problem and let the general duties officers in Bathurst go about their usual job.”