Corner Country hosts NSW's most remote service

The Remembrance Day ceremony at Packsaddle is held on top of a hill where a plaque dedicated to fallen soldiers stands. Photo by Mia Degoumois.
The Remembrance Day ceremony at Packsaddle is held on top of a hill where a plaque dedicated to fallen soldiers stands. Photo by Mia Degoumois.

In one of the most remote corners of NSW where the terrain is harsh and unforgiving sits a plaque dedicated to those who never returned to see “the vision splendid and the sunset plains extended”.

The lone plaque that sits atop a hill, 2km from Packsaddle Roadhouse, which is north of Broken Hill, has 360 degree breathtaking views.

Every year on Remembrance Day and Anzac Day, the entire population that surrounds Packsaddle Roadhouse, (30 people), leave their properties to remember those who served and fought and those that never returned.

“It’s a really special spot, it’s quiet and there is nothing as far as the eye can see,” said Mia Degoumois from Packsaddle Roadhouse.

Mrs Degoumois said the plaque was erected two years ago by Grant Breadhouer from Packsaddle Station, who donated it and the rock it sits on.

“We came up with the idea to put it up there because we always go to watch sunsets and sunrises there, which are absolutely amazing, so we thought it would be fitting to put it in such a beautiful place,” she said.

“We had quite a few soldiers that went off to war from here and never came back and with many of their descendants still living here we wanted a special place to remember them.”

This Remembrance Day locals will raise the Australian flag and stand for a minute of silence while overlooking Koonenberry Mountain.

“Standing up here it’s really quiet and respectful, there is no where else like it,” Mrs Degoumois said.

The Land