Bad decisions: More than 250 motorists killed on western roads

Almost 250 people have died on Central West and Orana roads and a further 2000 have been seriously injured since 2012, with speed, fatigue and alcohol the main causes.

Detailed data from Roads and Maritime Services has revealed what is killing motorists on Western NSW roads and it shows almost all accidents could have been prevented.

Speed was determined to be a factor in 142 deaths on the region’s roads between 2012 and 2016, while fatigue played a role in 84 fatalities and alcohol was involved in 52.

Tragically, 19 deaths were children under the age of 16.

Male drivers and riders aged 30 to 59 accounted for 40 per cent of all fatalities and almost one-third of all serious injuries in crashes.

Despite a concentrated effort from the police, 2017 was another bad year on the region’s roads with 41 people killed. 

Seven deaths occurred at the Dubbo Regional local government area, followed by five at Bathurst and Warrumbungle LGAs and four at Cabonne. Two people died on Orange roads.

Two people were killed during the Christmas-New Year operation run by the police, a 38-year-old woman at Yeoval and an 18-year-old man at Coolabah, near Nyngan.

Taking a stand: A Fairfax Media campaign Survive The Drive is aims to eliminate complacency on the road and help reduce the death toll.

Taking a stand: A Fairfax Media campaign Survive The Drive is aims to eliminate complacency on the road and help reduce the death toll.

Statewide 28 people were killed during the 18 days of Operation Safe Arrival.

Police have expressed their frustration at the spike in deaths with Assistant Commissioner Michael Corboy stressing that most deaths were avoidable.

“The tragedy is that nearly every one of those lives lost, was the result of a driver or rider making a bad decision,” he said.

Roads Minister Melinda Pavey has pleaded with motorists to make driving safely their main new year’s resolution.

“Every life lost is one too many and sadly in 2017 we lost 392 [across NSW]. That’s 392 people lost to their friends, families and communities forever,” she said.

“Let’s not forget the thousands of people across NSW who had to face the heartache of losing someone to a road crash and the many thousands more who are learning to live with lifelong injuries from crashes.”

Fairfax Media in partnership with Roads and Maritime Services and the NSW government has started the Survive The Drive campaign that aims to break through the complacency and reduce the road toll.

Comments

Discuss "Bad decisions: More than 250 motorists killed on western roads"

Please note: All comments made or shown here are bound by the Online Discussion Terms & Conditions.